Benefits of apprenticeships in 2019

In 2019, apprenticeships and work placements are becoming one of the most popular choices for young people and employers as part of their career journey into full-time work.

But what are some of the benefits of applying for an apprenticeship, and how does it compare to other forms of education, such as college or university?

For many apprentices across the country, their apprenticeship is a chance to gain hands-on, physical experience in a field with great promise for their future. Minimising the amount of time spent in a classroom and maximising the vocational skills learnt, apprenticeships and placements can help students to gain experience faster, preparing them for full-time employment. From labour and construction based courses to midwifery and creative arts, the interactive elements of an apprenticeship are ideal for those students who struggle to learn effectively in theoretical environments – making them a popular choice for many young people in 2019.

With unemployment rates on the rise and the cost of living to increase, an apprenticeship is also a benefit to those who want to begin work and gain important qualifications whilst earning. The concept of ‘earn while you learn’ is one of the biggest appeals of apprenticeships to students and young people, who would typically have to balance a full or part-time job alongside intensive studies. Combining the two and allowing those who want to start work straight out of school to continue growing their education and knowledge base is vital to expanding a qualified workforce for the future.

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Apprenticeships also have a key place in terms of personal development for young people and young learners. Removing the restrictions of a classroom environment, a vocational apprenticeship can help students can become independent, self-reliant and confident – boosting their abilities as well as their own self-belief in the skills they possess. Through one-on-one tutoring with experienced mentors, they can learn to build important professional relationships and work with a team to complete projects in real-life scenarios.

One of the most important benefits of an apprenticeship in 2019 is the improved employability of an apprentice after they complete their training. The rise of digital media is continuously introducing new hard and soft skills into traditional job roles, making it harder for young people to successfully apply for unique positions. With all of the skills that an apprenticeship introduces to a CV, those candidates who have achieved real-time experience and hands-on practice in their field are more likely to gain important roles and improve their overall employability.

Apprenticeships are a growing trend for the learners and workers of 2019 and often come with a significant number of unexpected benefits for young people in the UK. An essential option for school-leavers and for those looking to gain vital vocational skills, the introduction of apprenticeships as a viable career option is definitely a smart move in today’s modern society.

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To discuss a training course, arrange a visit to the Academy and receive expert advice, please contact the CEATA Training Manager; you’ll be glad you did!

Call: 0115 986 6321 or Email Us

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An overview of the apprenticeship levy

Please be aware that the following information refers only to businesses and apprenticeships in England. For operations in Scotland, Wales or Northern Ireland, you should contact your local authority for the most relevant information.

What is the apprenticeship levy?

The apprenticeship levy is a payment large employers pay to HMRC to pay for apprenticeship training. The aim of the levy is to encourage businesses to invest in apprenticeships and to improve their quality by raising additional funds.

Any apprentices who started their programme with you before May 1st 2017 are not be affected by the funding. You must continue to fund their training under the terms that were in place at the start of the apprenticeship.

What businesses have to pay the apprenticeship levy?

If you’re an employer with an annual pay bill of over £3 million, you must pay the apprenticeship levy. This rule came into force in April 2017. You will pay your levy to HMRC through PAYE. You will make monthly payments, so you can spread the cost of the apprenticeship.

How much is the levy?

The total levy payable per year is 0.5% of your company’s payroll, with an allowance of £15,000. So if your annual payroll is £3 million, you won’t pay anything, as your allowance covers the full 0.5%. If your annual payroll is £6 million, 0.5% would be £30,000. This means that you would pay £15,000 after deduction of your allowance.

Levy payments are taken automatically and applied to your online digital apprenticeship service account a few days later. They also benefit from a 10% top-up from the government. This means that for every £1 a business puts in, they get an extra 10p for free.

What can businesses use their levy for?

Businesses can only use the apprenticeship fund to pay for training and assessing apprentices that work in England for at least 50% of the time. You cannot use these funds to pay for any other associated costs. This includes wages, travel costs, work placements or setting up the apprenticeship programme.

You may only use up to the funding band maximum for your chosen apprenticeship. Should your costs exceed this amount, you must pay the difference from your own budget.

Find out more about the apprenticeship funding rules if you’re not sure what you can and can’t pay for with your apprenticeship funds.

Non-levy paying employers

Non-levy paying businesses will split the cost of apprenticeships with the government, which is known as ‘co-investment’. This allows smaller businesses to benefit from apprenticeships where they otherwise would not be able to afford them.

These businesses will pay 10% of the cost to train and assess apprentices, while the government will pay the remaining 90%,up to the funding band maximum.

How do businesses choose an apprenticeship provider?

While there are many different industries and levels for apprenticeships, there are two different types of apprenticeship model.

Apprenticeship standards cover a specific occupation. They will deliver the core skills, knowledge and behaviours that an apprentice will need to succeed in this occupation.

Apprenticeship frameworks are work-related vocational and professional qualifications. Delivery takes place both in workplace and classroom settings, developing both the practical and the theoretical aspects of the role.

Whatever apprenticeship provider you choose, they will adhere to the relevant apprenticeship standard or framework to ensure consistency.

Are you looking for an apprentice for your business?

Get in touch with CEATA to find out more about our apprenticeships and how hiring an engineering apprentice can benefit your business.

Call us Today

To discuss a training course, arrange a visit to the Academy and receive expert advice, please contact the CEATA Training Manager; you’ll be glad you did!

Call: 0115 986 6321 or Email Us

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Women in engineering and how apprenticeships can help

More than ever before, there is a huge drive for equality in the workplace. People of all ages, genders, races and religions are able to benefit from equal treatment in the recruitment process and during their employment.

Despite this, 2017 surveys indicate that only 11% of the engineering workforce is female.

While this is a positive change on the 9% reported in 2015, it still leads us to question of why there is such a difference between the genders when it comes to the engineering sector.

The relationship between females and physics at school

All students must study science to GCSE level (Core Science, Double Science or Triple Science), meaning that around half of all GCSE physics students are female. However, only around 20% of students that choose to study A Level physics are female. This has not changed in 25 years.

Some of the female students surveyed on this topic were worried about being “the only girl in the class” and some admitted that teachers presented A level physics as a “hard” subject and that hard subjects are “for men”.

The science and engineering sector has been steadily growing for a number of years. It has been estimated that the UK will need 1.82 million professionals in this industry by 2020. It’s therefore essential to expand the interest in science and engineering and, in particular, to improve its appeal to females.

Engineering students are second only to medical students in securing full-time jobs and earning good salaries. In a survey of 300 female engineers, 84% were either happy or extremely
happy with their career choice, showing that it can be a very rewarding and enjoyable option.

Engineering higher education qualifications and skills

2017 statistics show that only 5% of registered engineers and technicians (i.e. CEng, IEng, EngTech) are women. This seems to imply a reluctance to pursue formal education and training in this sector.

While both male and female engineering and technology students expressed a similar level of intent to work in the sector, 66.2% of males and 47.4% of females went on to engineering or technology careers.

There are several factors that could be behind this. One concern is that the skills taught in academic engineering qualifications don’t meet the requirements of employers seeking new recruits. There’s no denying that engineering degrees can be highly beneficial for students seeking employment in this sector. However, many employers value hands-on experience just as much, if not more.

How apprenticeships can help women in engineering

All students in the UK must remain in formal education or training until the age of 18. Many choose the ‘traditional’ route of A levels, which many consider to be academically demanding. This is not always the most advantageous option, depending on a student’s aptitude for academic exams or desired career path.

More and more students are taking the hands-on, skills-based approach of diplomas, such as BTECs or HNDs, or an apprenticeship.

Apprenticeships allow students to learn on the job, developing practical skills that apply directly to their chosen career. Rather than sitting in a classroom and learning the theoretical side of the job, apprentices apply themselves in the workshop. This allows them to benefit from expert supervision and training.

Apprenticeships are an engaging way to learn the skills necessary for an engineering career, and apprentices also earn a wage. It gives them a chance to try out a role or sector and see if it’s a good fit. Another benefit is that they can discover this without the time and money commitments of a degree.

These benefits are extremely appealing, making apprenticeships a good vehicle for increasing interest in engineering careers. It’s important to consider how we discuss apprenticeships, and to present them in a way that entices students.

Apprenticeships are stereotypically thought of as only being for the more ‘dirty’ manual industries such as construction or engineering. You can actually undertake an apprenticeship in almost any sector. Apprenticeships exist in business, customer service, media, healthcare and much more.

The more companies learn about the benefits of hiring an apprentice and how best to sell their apprenticeship to draw attention, the better the results will be for both businesses and engineering students.

Engineering apprenticeships at CEATA

CEATA is a dedicated training academy offering engineering qualifications and apprenticeships to people aged 16+ who are looking to upskill or start their career in the industry.

We’re passionate about ensuring that engineering skills are accessible, and we’re proud to have trained some talented and enthusiastic women.

If you’re looking to start an apprenticeship, or you’re interested in hiring apprentices in the engineering industry, get in touch with us today to find out more.

Call us Today

To discuss a training course, arrange a visit to the Academy and receive expert advice, please contact the CEATA Training Manager; you’ll be glad you did!

Call: 0115 986 6321 or Email Us

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